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The News Chair

Getting to Know You and Your Business

Lisa Deremiah

Tiffany Whisner

Tiffany Whisner

No matter what business or organization you might be in, there is likely some element of sales or business development involved.

It’s a job not for the faint of heart. You hear “no” many more times than “yes” — or you may not hear back at all. As far as a personality that works best in this environment, you’ve either got it or you don’t.

And Coles Marketing’s Lisa Deremiah has it — in spades.

 

Doing business with people

Lisa Deremiah

Lisa Deremiah

“I always have a list of potential clients I want to get in touch with,” Deremiah said. “I look at specific industries we do well with or want to get more involved with, and I do a lot of research online.” What’s she looking for?

An outdated website. No social media presence. Lack of media relations. A sales or business development professional will attempt to make a needs assessment even before reaching out to the client or customer.

“I try to find out who makes the marketing decisions and get them on the phone if possible,” she said. “And if that doesn’t work, I try to capture their email address and reach out to them that way.” But that’s certainly not her ideal situation.

“Technology has, of course, made some things easier and more efficient, but not everything. It’s definitely harder to get a face-to-face meeting now than it was five or 10 years ago, but I think face-to-face contact is still very important. People do business with people.”

Once the connection is made, Deremiah gives her pitch, which includes the reason she is calling, a brief background of Coles Marketing’s services and the opportunity to follow up with a meeting.

 

Positive pieces of business development

“It’s about follow up and consistency,” she said. “Maybe it’s a brush off, but if I connect with someone who is willing to do a follow-up call or email, that means they might want to work with us in the future.”

She has other advice for being more effective in a sales or business development position:

  • Be nice. Have a positive attitude on the phone. And make a good first impression in person — be polite, arrive on time, dress properly and have a firm handshake.
  • Listen more. A business relationship is much like a personal relationship. If you don’t click, you’re not going to move forward with the business — so listen to their needs more, and talk about your own accomplishments less.
  • Know your product. “I’m the first impression of Coles Marketing to potential clients, so I have to be knowledgeable about all we do and all we can offer,” Deremiah said.
  • Find out the answers. Go into your initial meeting as more of a fact finder. And if a question is asked you don’t know the answer to, make it a point to find out.
  • Perfect follow-up skills. Whether it’s a handwritten thank you, an email or a phone call, take the time to follow up after your meeting.
  • Offer a helpful tidbit. Part of your follow up can be sending a piece of helpful information — a case study demonstrating how your company has solved a problem; a website to check whether or not their website is mobile friendly; or an article appropriate to their industry.

 

One step closer to a yes

And finally, keep your promises. “I do what I say I’m going to do to the best of my ability,” Deremiah said. “That creates trust and lays a positive foundation.”

What about the frustration of getting all the “no” responses? It’s all part of the job.

“You have to not let it tear you up,” she said. “That’s why having a positive attitude is so important. Plus, every ‘no’ is one step closer to a ‘yes.’”

Interested in talking with Lisa about what Coles Marketing can offer your business? Call her at 317-571-0051 ext. 104 or email lderemiah@colesmarketing.com.

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Categories: 2015 August Newsletter, Newsletters | Tags: Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Price Paid for the Perfect Photo

Tiffany Whisner

Tiffany Whisner

An image can grab your reader’s attention or bring about emotion. It can encourage your customer to make a purchase.

Check out some statistics from Hubspot’s Amanda Sibley:

  • 90% of information transmitted to the brain is visual, and visuals are processed 60,000 times faster in the brain than text. (Sources: 3M and Zabisco)
  • 40% of people respond better to visual information than plain text. (Source: Zabisco)

The power of visual content

Kevin Moore

Kevin Moore

“Seeing an image gives the user experience of being able to relate that image to a personal memory or emotion, tying you to it,” said Coles Multimedia Designer Kevin Moore.

With the growth of content marketing and social media, we continue to look for images to get our messages across. It seems easier than ever with countless images available online at the click of a button.

But it’s essential to take precautions when choosing images to make sure you do it legally.

Know the rules before you use

Noelle Federico, the CFO of stock photo site Dreamstime.com, offers these tips:

  • Get familiar with fair use laws. These laws operate on a case-by-case basis, but there are general guidelines.
  • Investigate the source of an image before you copy it from the Web. Just because you “can” copy an image does NOT mean you have the right to use it.
  • Get permission. It’s best to get images you have authorization to use. You can purchase stock photos or use a free stock image website, such as Stock Free Images.
  • Search smarter. You can search images under the “Creative Commons license,” which allows for images the photographers have released for common use.
  • Cite appropriately. It’s safe to use an image for educational purposes. But when you use a photo this way, cite your source, giving credit to where you copied the picture.

Do your research or create your own!

How can you find the photos you want without getting a cease and desist order you don’t want?

Tim Coulon

Tim Coulon

Plus, here are more sources to discover cost-free content!

And if you can’t find the right photo, you can always create your own! Did you see the article “Six Simple Steps to Better Photos” from Coles VP Creative Tim Coulon? You should!

A picture may be worth a thousand … dollars

“Because images are so readily available and people are so used to sharing them through social sites, I think some may not understand the consequences of grabbing an image off the Web and posting it in a blog or e-blast,” Moore said.

He suggested using TinEye, a reverse image search website. You can find out where an image came from and how it’s being used.

“An image that may cost just a dollar to purchase can cost you thousands of dollars in a lawsuit if it’s used without permission and the proper citation,” Moore said. “Plus, there’s the embarrassment of being found out. It’s just not worth it.”

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Categories: 2014 August Newsletter, Newsletters | Tags: Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Framing Up for a New Look

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After years of successfully growing the Indiana Eye Clinic into one of central Indiana’s premier locations for surgery and treatment of the eye, the doctor/owners knew their website design needed a new look.

Brian Coles

Brian Coles

The old site was cluttered and unappealing, with few photographs or graphics, and contained too much wordy medical jargon. And it didn’t scale to mobile devices.

“A website’s lifespan is typically three to four years,” said Coles VP Marketing Brian Coles. “If your website exceeds that time without a major update or redesign, technology is likely to have passed you by, and you risk losing valuable consumers.

“The Indiana Eye Clinic website was last updated more than five years ago,” Coles continued. “Not only did the current website not match their new look, but the current wireframe did not support mobile browsing.”

The Coles Marketing team, working in close conjunction with the Indiana Eye Clinic, undertook a ground-up redesign of the site. This included an elegant restructuring of the site’s look to match the look of the new Clinic logo, which was designed by Coles.

WebSlick

Copy was recreated and new copy added for every subpage of the website. Coles also included custom photography that featured the Clinic’s doctors, staff and patients in an appealing light.

Technology was updated to a custom responsive design, so the Clinic now has one website optimized for every platform, including mobile devices and tablets.

“Today, creating websites in responsive design is seen as one of the industry’s best practices,” Coles said. “Responsive design is also preferred by Google because content that lives on one website and one URL is much easier for users to share, interact with and link to than content that lives on separate sites.”

Is your website screaming for a makeover?

Coles Marketing has the expertise to take your 24/7, greatest sales and customer platform — your website — to the next level.

“A clean, attractive website design does more than make your business or organization look good,” said Coles Multimedia Designer Kevin Moore. “It can bring in more customers and improve functionality for the ones you have.”

IEC_building

 

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